Quilt Con 2016–Not Chosen

I received the email that many other folks in the quilting world  received yesterday …
Dear Kim,
Thank you for entering your quilt to QuiltCon 2016.  There were many outstanding quilts submitted and
unfortunately we couldn't accept them all.  We regret to inform you that your quilt, Fen Koan (1228), was not chosen by our panel of jurors to be included in the show. We received more than 1,800 quilt submissions and the jurors had to make many difficult decisions.
Thank you again for your submission.
It arrived three times.

IMG_4861
You will not be seeing ‘Fen Koan’ at Quilt Con 2016
IMG_4617
or the ‘Amazing Technicolor Dream Heart’
Study in Glitz
Or a ‘Study in Glitz.’
And I’m 100% okay with it.  Of course I’m a bit bummed.  But one thing I’ve learned about rejection not being chosen is that it makes being chosen that much better!  If everything we create always gets accepted it starts to feel like the ‘norm’.  My quilts have been rejected not chosen for shows more times than I can count … or even remember.  But the ones that have been accepted – those I remember.  And with that memory, I can recall the feeling of joy and pride that went along with it.
Will I stop submitting quilts to shows because of not being chosen this year?  Of course not! 
Most of my readers know I have three young girls.  The older two are in competitive gymnastics  This was there first season in level 3 and it’s also the first season that everyone who participated did not get a medal for just being there.  The first meet that this happened was devastating to them.  There were tears and sadness.  But did they give up?  Not in the least.  They worked even harder and ended up medaling at the STATE competition.  And that pride and joy that went with those medals because they EARNED them was so much better than the smile they have when everyone gets a participation medal.
As I went back to read over my initial thoughts about this situation I realized I needed to change the word ‘rejection’ to ‘not chosen’.  I’m not being rejected … my quilts were just not what the jurors were looking for to put in that particular show.  It’s not that they are bad quilts, or uninteresting … it’s that they didn’t fit the aesthetic they want for the show.  Now I just have to find a show they will fit in to and see what happens!
Do not give up after not being chosen or not winning.  Keep trying.  Keep sewing.  Keep entering.  When you are chosen I guarantee it’s going to feel amazing!

7 comments:

  1. These are so fab! Thanks for sharing them and yes - go enter more shows!! I got 4 of these myself :-)

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  2. i love this, there are MANY shows your quilts will be perfect in!

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  3. I fully plan to keep trying, but other shows,
    I'm beginning to think my aesthetic just doesn't mesh with what the MQG wants. That being said, I will 100% continue on with other shows, being chosen feels wonderful, not being chosen means I don't have to hand sew labels or sleeves and I'm totally fine with that 😀

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  4. First of all--all three quilts are spectacular! Thank you for this post...as I too had all 3 of my quilts rejected/not get in. It was comforting to know that many other amazing quilts also did not get in...and there are lots of other opportunities awaiting our quilts. Keep on quiltin'!

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  5. I love all your quilts! Thank you for sharing - I am sure you will them in other shows and I will have the opportunity to gaze at them in person!

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  6. I would love to see Amazing Technicolor Dream Heart in person! Maybe you should submit it for the International Quilt Festival in Houston next fall; I go every year, and this is something I would love to see!

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